Non Animal Testing, Alternative Test Methods, In Vitro Toxicology, IIVS | NewsType Posters & Presentations
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Posters & Presentations

How the Good In Vitro Method Practices Guidance Document Can Help Implement New Toxicological Approaches: A Case Study in China

October 17, 2018

Currently China is striving to adopt and implement non-animal, including in vitro, testing approaches for the safety assessment of cosmetics and ingredients.  Collaborative efforts between industry and the Institute for In Vitro Sciences (IIVS, Gaithersburg, USA) have focused on the transfer of several OECD Test Guideline methods to government laboratories in China and have supported the creation of an in vitro toxicology testing laboratory within the Zhejiang Institute for Food and Drug Control (Hangzhou, China).  Recently BASF SE (Ludwigshafen, Germany) and IIVS have partnered to introduce a cell based in vitro skin sensitization test, LuSens, into China using the principles of GIVIMP as a standard.  This case study exemplifies the practical way in which the GIVIMP guidance can assist interested parties in the development, transfer and establishment of in vitro approaches.

Evaluation of Phototoxicity of Ocular Medical and Combination Devices

March 28, 2018

To address ocular device induced phototoxicity, an in vitro 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake Phototoxicity test (OECD 432) for chemicals has been modified. Soft contact lenses formulated with three different photo-absorbing compounds and chemical solutions of these compounds were evaluated.

The Assessment of Phototoxicity Using the 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) Phototoxicity Assay and a Modified Photo-Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay (DPRA)

March 28, 2018

Alternative methods, including the validated 3T3 Neutral Red Uptake (NRU) Phototoxicity assay (OECD TG 432) may be used as a pre-clinical test to address phototoxicity. Currently, there are no validated alternative test methods to identify photoallergens; however, there are several validated alternative test methods to address skin sensitization, including the Direct Peptide Reactivity Assay (DPRA) (OECD 442C). To address photoallergy, we utilized the 3T3 Phototoxicity assay in combination with a modified photo-DPRA assay to determine if these assays were able to 1) identify compounds with phototoxicity potential and 2) discriminate between photoirritants and photoallergens.

Human In Vitro Models for Respiratory Toxicology: Evaluation of Goblet Cell Hyperplasia, Mucus Production, and Ciliary Beating Assays

March 28, 2018

Robust non-animal models and assays for pulmonary toxicology are required to make competent product development and risk assessments for new materials requiring toxicity testing. Three in vitro assays (goblet cell hyperplasia , ciliary beat frequency , and MUC5AC quantitation) were evaluated for performance and reproducibility. To assess these assays, 6 laboratories contributed data using a common protocol utilizing IL-13 as an inducer of adverse mucociliary-relevant tissue changes. MatTek EpiAirway™ and Epithelix MucilAir™ 3D tissue models were used to evaluate endpoints using histology for GCH, software-based applications, Cilia FA and SAVA, for CBF, and ELISA assay for MUC5AC.

Use of Ex Vivo Precision-Cut Lung Slices as a Screening Tool for Potential Respiratory Toxicity of E-Liquids

March 28, 2018

E-vapor product liquids contain a variety of ingredient combinations that should be assessed for human risk. One human lung-relevant testing platform with reasonable throughput, is human precision-cut lung slices (HuPCLS). HuPCLS are arguably the most complex non-animal model of the lung, retaining native architecture and immune-competent cells over multi-week culture periods. HuPCLS were exposed to three concentrations (0.1%, 0.5%, and 1.2%) of propylene glycol (PG; an E-vapor product constituent) continuously for 16-days. Exposure-effects were evaluated biochemically (WST-8 assay) and histologically (viability assessment of H&E stained slides). Positive control treatments consisted of 10 µM Phortress and 13 µM bleomycin.

Oral Irritation Assessment of Electronic Liquids Using an In Vitro Oral Testing Model

March 28, 2018

While data are still being collected and analyzed, there were at least 1,300 accidental electronic liquid (e-liquid) exposures reported as of 2013. Deaths have occurred as a result of ingestion of e-liquid with the effects being attributed primarily to nicotine. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) sought to regulate e-liquid through the Tobacco Control Act passed in 2009. In 2014, the FDA issued its “Deeming” proposals for public comments, which covered e-liquid manufacturing; the Final Rule giving the FDA authority to regulate e-liquids was released on May 5th, 2016. This study investigated the oral irritation of 3 different formulations of e-liquid using an in vitro time course assay in the reconstructed tissue model EpiOral™ (MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA, USA). All products were from the same manufacturer, contained 1.2% nicotine and differed only in their flavorings.

Nicotine Characterization of an In Vitro Inhalation Exposure System Using Conventional and Next-Generation Tobacco Products: A US/UK Inter-Laboratory Comparison

March 28, 2018

The US-FDA has regulatory authority over tobacco products, including conventional cigarettes and next generation products (NGPs) such as e-cigarettes and tobacco heating products (THPs). There is a desire by the industry, regulator and animal protection organizations to incorporate non-animal test methods for tobacco product and NGP assessment. When assessing respiratory effects in vitro, reliable exposure systems that deliver aerosols to cellular/tissue cultures at the air-liquid interface are needed.

Quality Considerations: Redefining Test Systems from Animals to Tissues and Beyond

August 28, 2017

The use of non-whole animal test methods transforms the way regulatory requirements are applied in preclinical testing. Recent global regulatory initiatives emphasize the importance of transitioning to human relevant assays and test systems that do not use animals. When these methods are moved from research into the regulated arena, GLP principles must be followed. The GLPs were originally written in the 1970s, when the vast majority of regulated research was performed using animals as the test system. Current innovative, alternative test systems include ex vivo tissues, manufactured biological systems, three dimensional tissue constructs, and cell cultures maintained in dynamic flow bioreactors. Each type of alternative test system raises new quality and compliance points to consider when used within a regulatory context. Just as the applications of these methods have advanced with regulatory acceptance, the quality control and compliance of these test systems must also progress.

Introducing the 3R Concepts into Pre-College Classrooms

August 28, 2017

This poster provides a snapshot of pre-college teachers (46) within the U.S.—gauging their knowledge and familiarity of the 3Rs and non-animal testing methods (i.e. in vitro methods), initiative to address the topic in the classroom, and their students’ level of interest in the topic. While recognizing the ethical considerations related to animal experimentation, the current generation of teachers and students are also eager to understand the relevance, reliability, and reproducibility of in vitro methods as the modern wave of technologies in toxicology, and possible replacement of animal use for testing purposes. Our data indicate an education field eager to learn about new concepts that might impact our daily activities in an ethical way, and to get up to speed with advances in science.

Non-Animal Testing Approach to Address Biocompatibility Testing of Medical Devices Required by the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA)

August 28, 2017

Presented at the 2017 World Congress on Alternatives and Animals in the Life Sciences (WC10)

E. Hill, R. Curren, and G.-E. Costin Starting in December 2015, personal lubricants must receive pre-market approval from the US FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) in order to be sold in the US. Part of the testing battery for biocompatibility includes the in vivo Rabbit Vaginal Irritation (RVI) test. We have created an Industry Consortium comprised of personal lubricants manufacturers and are working collaboratively with stakeholders and the US FDA to develop an in vitro testing approach to substitute for the RVI. Our Validation Program will analyze paired in vivo-in vitro data for vaginal irritation utilizing commercially available human reconstructed vaginal tissue models. A Prediction Model will be proposed that can be used for the safety assessment of personal lubricants. Our Validation Program proposal has been accepted in the Incubator Phase of the US FDA Medical Device Development Tool (MDDT) Pilot Program and is currently ongoing.